During Trump’s present, it’s hard to write the future, says science fiction writer John Scalzi – LA Times

It’s difficult to focus on writing, particularly fiction, when the world feels like it’s on fire.

“To be sure, these times — by which I mean the Trump era to date, let’s go ahead and avoid cutesy winking allusions — are making it hard for lots of writers, not just the ones who write science fiction. It’s difficult to focus on writing, particularly fiction, when the world feels like it’s on fire and everyone you know is trying to decide between hiding in a hole or taking up recreational alcoholism to get by.”

Source: During Trump’s present, it’s hard to write the future, says science fiction writer John Scalzi – LA Times

Advertisements

Review: Stephen King’s ‘Bazaar of Bad Dreams’ pulls us in and then out – LA Times

Portrait of Stephen King. (Joy Saavedra / For The Times)

Portrait of Stephen King. (Joy Saavedra / For The Times)

Stephen King , I’ve come to think, is at his most adept when writing in the midlength range. His big novels — “The Stand,” “It,” “11/22/63” — have always felt a little baggy to me, while his shortest work (he has published more than 200 stories, gathered in a number of collections) can feel sketchy, more idea than nuanced narrative.

Source: Review: Stephen King’s ‘Bazaar of Bad Dreams’ pulls us in and then out – LA Times

Stephen King, Not Just the Guy Who Makes Monsters – The New York Times

 Stephen King Credit Shane Leonard

Stephen King Credit Shane Leonard

If there are any lingering doubts about Mr. King’s stylistic range, they should be put to rest by his new collection, “The Bazaar of Bad Dreams,” which features 20 stories that seem to touch on every genre imaginable, except for romance. There are crime and horror stories, a narrative poem and a grim western, along with realistic stories about marriage, aging and substance abuse.

Source: Stephen King, Not Just the Guy Who Makes Monsters – The New York Times