Dan Rather, An Unlikely Essayist, On ‘What Unites Us’

Equally optimistic and concerned, the longtime television news anchor — now a Facebook phenomenon — has written a book that doesn’t hide his love of country.

Editor’s Note: I’ve followed Dan on Facebook and Twitter over the past year, and he speaks truly, openly, and in defense of an America and American values I believe are core to our nation’s history, traditions, and democracy. Worth a listen to his views, if you get the chance…

Source: Dan Rather, An Unlikely Essayist, On ‘What Unites Us’

Advertisements

Paul Theroux Deep South; More World War I Sites

Author Paul Theroux shares the insights he gleaned about America from the people he met in the small towns and backroads of the Deep South. Then history professor Mark D. Van Ells returns with more suggestions for visiting places that honor the sacrifices of Allied troops in World War I. For more information on Travel with Rick Steves – including episode descriptions, program archives and related details – visit http://www.ricksteves.com.

  • * Duration: 51:17

* Published: 10/20/17 5:00:00 PM

* Episode Download Link: http://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/podcasts.ricksteves.com/feeds/pgm445a_pod.mp3

* Episode Feed: Travel with Rick Steves – http://podcasts.ricksteves.com/ricksteves.xml

A Very Old Man for a Wolf

It’s the nature of the wolf to travel. By age two, wolves of both sexes usually leave their birth packs and strike out on their own, sometimes covering hundreds of miles as they search for mates and new territory. Whatever the reason, when wolves move, they do it with intent—and quickly. Humans don’t know how they decide which way to go, but the choice is as important as any they’ll ever make.

Source: A Very Old Man for a Wolf

Writers in Paris

In the years after the First World War, a number of American writers took up residence in Paris. Steve Cleary assesses some of the work that came out of their time abroad. …

The 1920s was the golden age of literary modernism, and Paris was then the literary and artistic capital of the western world. A remarkable number of the men among these writers-in-exile had volunteered as ambulance drivers during the war, including the young Ernest Hemingway, who was seriously wounded while serving on the Italian front.

Source: Writers in Paris