How I Rolled on the Crescent: New York to New Orleans by Rail

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Paul Theroux Deep South; More World War I Sites

Author Paul Theroux shares the insights he gleaned about America from the people he met in the small towns and backroads of the Deep South. Then history professor Mark D. Van Ells returns with more suggestions for visiting places that honor the sacrifices of Allied troops in World War I. For more information on Travel with Rick Steves – including episode descriptions, program archives and related details – visit http://www.ricksteves.com.

  • * Duration: 51:17

* Published: 10/20/17 5:00:00 PM

* Episode Download Link: http://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/podcasts.ricksteves.com/feeds/pgm445a_pod.mp3

* Episode Feed: Travel with Rick Steves – http://podcasts.ricksteves.com/ricksteves.xml

Writers in Paris

In the years after the First World War, a number of American writers took up residence in Paris. Steve Cleary assesses some of the work that came out of their time abroad. …

The 1920s was the golden age of literary modernism, and Paris was then the literary and artistic capital of the western world. A remarkable number of the men among these writers-in-exile had volunteered as ambulance drivers during the war, including the young Ernest Hemingway, who was seriously wounded while serving on the Italian front.

Source: Writers in Paris

The Wondrous Complexity of the New York Public Library | Arts & Culture | Smithsonian

The main branch of the NYPL, located on Fifth Avenue in midtown Manhattan. (© The New York Public Library)

The main branch of the NYPL, located on Fifth Avenue in midtown Manhattan. (© The New York Public Library)

A new documentary captures the sweeping human impact of one of the country’s largest library systems

Source: The Wondrous Complexity of the New York Public Library | Arts & Culture | Smithsonian