Scout Archives – British Library: Turning the Pages

“Turning the Pages is a software program developed by Armadillo Studios that enables libraries and museums to digitize books, manuscripts, and other documents in an engaging 3D format. Here, readers will find the British Library’s spectacular collection of items digitized with this software.”

Source: Scout Archives – British Library: Turning the Pages

Home Prices: How To See If They Are Rising Or Falling Where You Live : NPR

Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies

 

 

 

 

 

 

In much of the U.S., the housing crash hangover lingers. New tabulation of home price data lets you zoom in on hundreds of metro areas and counties around the country.

Source: Home Prices: How To See If They Are Rising Or Falling Where You Live : NPR

The Librarian Who Guarded the Manhattan Project’s Secrets – Atlas Obscura

Inner view of the Manhattan Project's scientific library Courtesy Los Alamos Historical Society Photo Archives

Inner view of the Manhattan Project’s scientific library Courtesy Los Alamos Historical Society Photo Archives

Women working at the Manhattan Project Oak Ridge site US Department of Energy/Public Domain

Women working at the Manhattan Project Oak Ridge site US Department of Energy/Public Domain

While dodging accusations of communism, Charlotte Serber made the nuclear bomb possible.

Source: The Librarian Who Guarded the Manhattan Project’s Secrets – Atlas Obscura

COMMENTARY: Young adults aren’t growing up as fast as they used to – Las Vegas Review-Journal

COMMENTARY: Young adults aren’t growing up as fast as they used to – Las Vegas Review-Journal

Perhaps these trends can be extrapolated to the future. Or perhaps not. The new lifestyles have emerged only in the past few decades — too recently to know the long-term effects.

See also: The Changing Economics and Demographics of Young Adulthood: 1975-2016 and Emerging adulthood and early adulthood

Source: COMMENTARY: Young adults aren’t growing up as fast as they used to – Las Vegas Review-Journal

The age of unenlightenment

Edinburgh’s statue of David Hume, the 18th-century philosopher © Kieran Dodds/Panos Pictures

Edinburgh’s statue of David Hume, the 18th-century philosopher © Kieran Dodds/Panos Pictures

The most pressing question of our age is not what will happen when the computers outsmart us. Nor is it the future of globalisation, or how to stop climate change. It is much more fundamental than these.

Why is everyone so mean and stupid, and why is it getting worse?

Book essay: The Knowledge Illusion: Why We Never Think Alone, cognitive scientists Steven Sloman and Philip Fernbach.

Source: The age of unenlightenment