To Your Brain, Audiobooks Are Not ‘Cheating’ — Science of Us

A cognitive psychologist on a question that annoys him.

Source: To Your Brain, Audiobooks Are Not ‘Cheating’ — Science of Us

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A Very Old Man for a Wolf

It’s the nature of the wolf to travel. By age two, wolves of both sexes usually leave their birth packs and strike out on their own, sometimes covering hundreds of miles as they search for mates and new territory. Whatever the reason, when wolves move, they do it with intent—and quickly. Humans don’t know how they decide which way to go, but the choice is as important as any they’ll ever make.

Source: A Very Old Man for a Wolf

How Social Media Endangers Knowledge | WIRED

Alan Schein/Getty Images

Alan Schein/Getty Images

Social networks train us to focus on images and emotions, sapping the quest for knowledge.

Social networks, though, have since colonized the web for television’s values. From Facebook to Instagram, the medium refocuses our attention on videos and images, rewarding emotional appeals—‘like’ buttons—over rational ones. Instead of a quest for knowledge, it engages us in an endless zest for instant approval from an audience, for which we are constantly but unconsciouly performing.

Source: How Social Media Endangers Knowledge | WIRED

Books for kids: “The Lost Words” by Robert Macfarlane was born from an Oxford dictionary debate — Quartz

Bringing back “moss,” “blackberry,” and “bluebell” instead of “blog,” “chatroom,” and “database.”

“What’s to become of kids these days, with their damn pocket computers and inability to differentiate between bird species?”

“The Lost Words is a new book for people worried the next generation will lose touch with nature. Written by Robert Macfarlane with illustrations by Jackie Morris, it’s a catalogue and spelling book for kids, where the lost words in question comprise vocabulary about flora and fauna.”

Source: Books for kids: “The Lost Words” by Robert Macfarlane was born from an Oxford dictionary debate — Quartz