‘Poetry for the ear’: Bob Dylan wins Nobel Prize in literature – The Washington Post

“Bob Dylan was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature on Thursday for work that the Swedish Academy described as “having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition.”He is the first American to win the prize since Toni Morrison in 1993, and a groundbreaking choice by the Nobel committee to select the first literature laureate whose career has primarily been as a musician.”

Source: ‘Poetry for the ear’: Bob Dylan wins Nobel Prize in literature – The Washington Post

Google Cultural Institute Puts Us All Onstage – The New York Times

 A still from an immersive video of Benjamin Millepied’s dance piece “Clear, Loud, Bright, Forward.” Credit Google Cultural Institute/Palais Garnier

A still from an immersive video of Benjamin Millepied’s dance piece “Clear, Loud, Bright, Forward.” Credit Google Cultural Institute/Palais Garnier

The 360-degree videos are part of an innovative assemblage of performing arts groups that went online on Tuesday morning at the Google Cultural Institute, a free website that made its name in recent years by digitizing and displaying the collections of more than 800 art museums and historical archives. The Google initiative is now moving into the performing arts, and this exhibition is the first fruit of its partnerships with more than 60 groups from around the world — with the groups providing the content and Google providing the gee-whiz technology.

Source: Google Cultural Institute Puts Us All Onstage – The New York Times

With grace and sly charm, Garrison Keillor prepares to exit ‘Prairie Home Companion’ – LA Times

Whispery and wise and flecked with eccentric humor, Garrison Keillor’s baritone has long seeped across a nation that, despite its perpetual restiveness and cravings for trends, has found comfort in his brand of Midwestern pragmatism, schmaltz and slow-motion charm.

via With grace and sly charm, Garrison Keillor prepares to exit ‘Prairie Home Companion’ – LA Times.

The Golden Age of Radio in the US · DPLA Omeka

Tuning into the radio is now an integrated part of our everyday lives. We tune in while we drive, while we work, while we cook in our kitchens. Just 100 years ago, it was a novelty to turn on a radio. The radio emerged at the turn of the twentieth century, the result of decades of scientific experimentation with the theory that information could be transmitted over long distances. Radio as a medium reached its peak—the so-called Radio Golden Age—during the Great Depression and World War II. This was a time when the world was rapidly changing, and for the first time Americans experienced those history-making events as they happened. The

Photograph of a young girl listening to the ra...

Photograph of a young girl listening to the radio during the Great Depression. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

emergence and popularity of radio shifted not just the way Americans across the country experienced news and entertainment, but also the way they communicated. This exhibition explores the development, rise, and adaptation of the radio, and its impact on American culture.

via The Golden Age of Radio in the US · DPLA Omeka.

 

The Long, Strange Purgatory of Casey Kasem

He was America’s most beloved deejay, the unmistakable voice who created ‘American top 40’ and rose to fame on the schmaltzy but irresistible charm of his “long-distance dedications.” all of which makes the tabloid circumstances of his demise—an epic family feud waged in streets, courtrooms, and funeral homes from L.A. to Oslo—even more surreal. Amy Wallace investigates the tragic final days (and very weird afterlife) of a radio legend

via The Long, Strange Purgatory of Casey Kasem.

Photo taken at the 41st Emmy Awards 9/17/89 - ...

Photo taken at the 41st Emmy Awards 9/17/89 – Permission granted to copy, publish or post but please credit “photo by Alan Light” if you can. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Save our Sounds: 15 years to save the UK’s sound collections – Sound and vision blog

The UK’s audio collections are under threat. Often created on media that over time has become unstable, they are at risk – both from physical degradation and from the obsolescence of technology to replay them.

Professional consensus is that we have approximately 15 years in which to save the UK’s sound collections before they become unplayable and are effectively lost. The solution is to digitally preserve them, but the scale of the task required is considerable and time is running out.

via Save our Sounds: 15 years to save the UK’s sound collections – Sound and vision blog.