LVCVA : Las Vegas Celebrates Dean Martin: The King of Cool

“LAS VEGAS — Elvis Presley once told Deana Martin, “They call me the King of Rock and Roll, but your dad is the King of Cool.”

From his solo career to his appearances with the Rat Pack and his infamous Celebrity Roasts, Dean Martin made the Las Vegas stage his home. Known for his smooth and effortless style, Martin has become a timeless Las Vegas icon. Dean Martin would have turned 100 on June 7. We celebrate the “King of Cool” with this tribute featuring photos and video from the Las Vegas News Bureau archives. In addition, the News Bureau has produced an exhibition in the Las Vegas Convention Center featuring exclusive photographs from its archives and rare Las Vegas memorabilia.”

Source: LVCVA : Las Vegas Celebrates Dean Martin: The King of Cool

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CIA Menu Collection – CIA Digital Collections

“About this collection

The Culinary Institute of America’s special collection of 30,000 historical menus includes menus from CIA restaurants and donations from major menu collectors, including George Lang, Chapman S. Root, Vinnie Oakes, and Roy Andries de Groot.  Assembled over decades, the collection illustrates the history of dining in America and abroad, with menus from all of the states and over 80 countries, as well as ships, railroads and airlines.”

Source: CIA Menu Collection – CIA Digital Collections

Home | What America Ate


From the About page: “The 1930s are a fascinating moment to study food. Examining how ordinary people bought, cooked, ate, and thought about food can reveal previously hidden aspects of American life during a time of vast economic and social change. What America Ate’s website invites users to interact with and enhance the historical sources, while the digital archive allows users to approach American food in the Depression from three distinct angles.”

Source: Home | What America Ate

Anthony Bourdain’s Interview with David Remnick

Anthony Bourdain—the chef turned author, food anthropologist, and television star—died this week, at sixty-one. Bourdain made his début in The New Yorker in 1999, with an essay called “Don’t Eat Before Reading This,” about working in the restaurant industry. {{}}It was an account of what really goes on in restaurants—extremely vivid, funny, gross, and, in parts, genuinely disturbing. After the success of that article, Bourdain went on to publish his best-selling memoir, “Kitchen Confidential,” a

* duration: 19:20, Played: 18:52

* Published: 6/8/18 8:00:00 AM

* Episode Download Link (18 MB): https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/tnyradiohour/tnyradiohour060818_podcastbonus_bourdain.mp3

* Show Notes: http://www.wnycstudios.org/story/anthony-bourdains-interview-david-remnick/

* Episode feed: The New Yorker Radio Hour – http://feeds.wnyc.org/newyorkerradiohour