Out In The Garden Bee-Dazzled And Bee-Dizened And Bees Showing Their Knees

Bees are special and important.. thanks Tish!

Tish Farrell

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I popped out in the garden at lunch time, armed with my little Canon Ixus, and found it was all go on the bee front. The header flower, Helianthus Capenoch Star was proving very popular. I’d only bought it the other day, to go in the back of the flower bed that I said was ‘officially full’, and it is still in its pot, waiting for a slightly cooler moment to plant it out. In the meantime, it is being much visited. But then that goes for most of the other flowers: zinnias, cosmos, liatris, doronicum, echinacea, rudbeckia, and the self-sown purple toadflax. So many happy buzzing souls.

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And then there was also the hoverfly:

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How to Teach Information Literacy in an Era of Lies – The Chronicle of Higher Education

Whatever your discipline, you should also be teaching students how to understand, assess, evaluate, and apply information.

Source: How to Teach Information Literacy in an Era of Lies – The Chronicle of Higher Education

The Daughter as Detective

Good read.. loved the story opening about library school…

Longreads

Alice Bolin | Dead Girls | HarperCollins | June 2018 | 27 minutes (7,414 words)

My parents met as library students at the University of Kentucky in 1979. From my intimate point of view, library school is a bit of an academic catchall, sometimes a plan B, appealing to weirdos of many backgrounds. People assume that librarians love books, but that isn’t even it. University librarians like my parents love flying below the radar, omniscient about university curriculum but not bound by classroom teaching, grading, or even regular students. When she went to library school, my mom was a 25-year-old polyglot, very pretty and shy, who until then had been taking graduate German courses and hanging around Lincoln, Nebraska, listening to the Who. My dad was 32, starting a new career after years of working for the army as an Arabic translator. He is very loud and friendly, bubbly…

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Anthony Bourdain’s Interview with David Remnick

Anthony Bourdain—the chef turned author, food anthropologist, and television star—died this week, at sixty-one. Bourdain made his début in The New Yorker in 1999, with an essay called “Don’t Eat Before Reading This,” about working in the restaurant industry. {{}}It was an account of what really goes on in restaurants—extremely vivid, funny, gross, and, in parts, genuinely disturbing. After the success of that article, Bourdain went on to publish his best-selling memoir, “Kitchen Confidential,” a

* duration: 19:20, Played: 18:52

* Published: 6/8/18 8:00:00 AM

* Episode Download Link (18 MB): https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/tnyradiohour/tnyradiohour060818_podcastbonus_bourdain.mp3

* Show Notes: http://www.wnycstudios.org/story/anthony-bourdains-interview-david-remnick/

* Episode feed: The New Yorker Radio Hour – http://feeds.wnyc.org/newyorkerradiohour

Bright lights, casinos and home for Golden Knights | KSNV

To celebrate the Vegas Golden Knights hockey team making it to the Stanley Cup playoffs in their inaugural season, New York New York Hotel & Casino dressed their Statue of Liberty in a Vegas Golden Knights jersey. Friday, April 13, 2018. CREDIT: Glenn Pinkerton/Las Vegas News Bureau

To celebrate the Vegas Golden Knights hockey team making it to the Stanley Cup playoffs in their inaugural season, New York New York Hotel & Casino dressed their Statue of Liberty in a Vegas Golden Knights jersey. Friday, April 13, 2018. CREDIT: Glenn Pinkerton/Las Vegas News Bureau

Pierre-Edouard Bellemare didn’t know what to do as he browsed in the grocery store. Fans were admiring the native Frenchman and center for the Vegas Golden Knights, but he had become star-struck himself.“I’m pretty sure I saw Steffi Graf,” Bellemare said.

Source: Bright lights, casinos and home for Golden Knights | KSNV