This Day in History: Mark Twain Debuts Iconic Style at Library of Congress | Library of Congress Blog

Mark Twain. Photograph by Frances Benjamin Johnston, 1906.

Mark Twain. Photograph by Frances Benjamin Johnston, 1906.

Post about Mark Twain’s debut of his white suit at a hearing at the Library of Congress.

Source: This Day in History: Mark Twain Debuts Iconic Style at Library of Congress | Library of Congress Blog

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Posters of the Winter Season | Picture This: Library of Congress Prints & Photos

The following is a guest post by Jan Grenci, Reference Specialist for Posters, Prints and Photographs Division.

Winter is one of my favorite seasons, what with the snow, and the cookies, and the caroling. There are a number of posters in the collections of the Prints and Photographs Division that illustrate some of the things that make winter the most wonderful time of the year.

Posters of the Winter Season. A blog post at “Picture This: Library of Congress Prints & Photos” on 2017-12-06.

Source: Posters of the Winter Season | Picture This: Library of Congress Prints & Photos

Dan Rather, An Unlikely Essayist, On ‘What Unites Us’

Equally optimistic and concerned, the longtime television news anchor — now a Facebook phenomenon — has written a book that doesn’t hide his love of country.

Editor’s Note: I’ve followed Dan on Facebook and Twitter over the past year, and he speaks truly, openly, and in defense of an America and American values I believe are core to our nation’s history, traditions, and democracy. Worth a listen to his views, if you get the chance…

Source: Dan Rather, An Unlikely Essayist, On ‘What Unites Us’

Paul Theroux Deep South; More World War I Sites

Author Paul Theroux shares the insights he gleaned about America from the people he met in the small towns and backroads of the Deep South. Then history professor Mark D. Van Ells returns with more suggestions for visiting places that honor the sacrifices of Allied troops in World War I. For more information on Travel with Rick Steves – including episode descriptions, program archives and related details – visit http://www.ricksteves.com.

  • * Duration: 51:17

* Published: 10/20/17 5:00:00 PM

* Episode Download Link: http://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/podcasts.ricksteves.com/feeds/pgm445a_pod.mp3

* Episode Feed: Travel with Rick Steves – http://podcasts.ricksteves.com/ricksteves.xml

Writers in Paris

In the years after the First World War, a number of American writers took up residence in Paris. Steve Cleary assesses some of the work that came out of their time abroad. …

The 1920s was the golden age of literary modernism, and Paris was then the literary and artistic capital of the western world. A remarkable number of the men among these writers-in-exile had volunteered as ambulance drivers during the war, including the young Ernest Hemingway, who was seriously wounded while serving on the Italian front.

Source: Writers in Paris

How Social Media Endangers Knowledge | WIRED

Alan Schein/Getty Images

Alan Schein/Getty Images

Social networks train us to focus on images and emotions, sapping the quest for knowledge.

Social networks, though, have since colonized the web for television’s values. From Facebook to Instagram, the medium refocuses our attention on videos and images, rewarding emotional appeals—‘like’ buttons—over rational ones. Instead of a quest for knowledge, it engages us in an endless zest for instant approval from an audience, for which we are constantly but unconsciouly performing.

Source: How Social Media Endangers Knowledge | WIRED