Stephen King: on alcoholism and returning to the Shining

 Stephen King: 'I have no wish to shut the door on the past. I have been pretty upfront about my past. But do I regret? I do. I do.' Photograph: Steve Schofield for the Guardian Steve Schofield/Guardian

Stephen King: ‘I have no wish to shut the door on the past. I have been pretty upfront about my past. But do I regret? I do. I do.’ Photograph: Steve Schofield for the Guardian Steve Schofield/Guardian

Stephen King has written a lot of books – at 56 novels, he’s closing in on Agatha Christie – some of which have been great, some of which less so. Still, he says, when people say, “Steve, your books are uneven”, he’s confident “there’s good stuff in all of ’em”. Now and then, a story lingers in his mind long after it’s published. When fans ask what happened to Charlie McGee in Firestarter, for example, King isn’t interested. But when they ask what happened to Danny Torrance, the boy from The Shining, he always found himself wondering. Specifically: what the story would have looked like if Danny’s father – mad “white-knuckle alcoholic” Jack Torrance – had “found AA. And I thought, well, let’s find out.”

Source: Stephen King: on alcoholism and returning to the Shining

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Happy Thanksgiving!

Happy Thanksgiving to all…

charles french words reading and writing

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Happy Thanksgiving! Remember to recognize the positives and the blessings in your life.

Enjoy your feasts, your gatherings, and your traditions.  And please remember to give thanks to those who help us in many ways. So many are away from home, friends, and family, and we should all give them a moment of thanks for their service.

To my friends and family–thank you!

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The Modern Invention of Thanksgiving | JSTOR Daily

When you think of the history of Thanksgiving, you’d be hard-pressed not to picture funny Pilgrim hats and stereotyped Native Americans. These days, most of us know that the sanitized story we learned in grade school bears little resemblance to the real history of the Plymouth colony. But it might still come as a surprise to hear that, as Anne Blue Wills argues in a 2003 article in Church History, Thanksgiving as we know it was deliberately invented in the 19th Century.

Source: The Modern Invention of Thanksgiving | JSTOR Daily

FFF: The 2015 Holiday Season

FFF: The 2015 Holiday Season
November 24, 2015

Release Number: CB15-FF.25

This festive season, or simply the holidays, is a time for gathering and celebrating with family and friends, gift giving, reflection and thanks. To commemorate this time of year, the U.S. Census Bureau presents the following holiday-related facts and figures from its collection of statistics.

Source: FFF: The 2015 Holiday Season

Realizing the Democratic Potential of Online Sources in the Classroom | Digital Scholarship in the Humanities

Our hypothesis was simple enough: undergraduates would better understand a historic document online if, instead of having a traditional textual introduction, the same information was made available in bite-size balloons invoked by the users clicking on pins distributed throughout the document. Half the students had a pinned edition and half a more traditional one, while they all had several hours to explore the same eight-page crew agreement from the late 19th century. They then filled out quizzes, short answer tests, and went through an extensive debriefing. The results surprised us. Form made no difference whatsoever, none of the students understood the document’s content. We concluded their difficulty stemmed from living in the immediate, rather than in a temporally informed present, and so they could not fathom the profundity of the past.

Source: Realizing the Democratic Potential of Online Sources in the Classroom | Digital Scholarship in the Humanities

>> Sad to say, the students in this experiment could not understand a document from the past. It does not bode well for living in the now, and moving into the future. What’s that quote, those who do not [know] remember the past….

Ernest Hemingway’s ode to Paris sells out – BBC News

Since the attacks in Paris last Friday, one book has been selling out in bookshops across the city: Ernest Hemingway’s A Moveable Feast.The author’s account of living in Paris in his youth is seen as a love letter to the city, its cafes and bars, and the Parisian way of life.In French its title is translated as “Paris est une fête”, or “Paris is a party”.

Source: Ernest Hemingway’s ode to Paris sells out – BBC News

Thanksgiving, the Julia Child Way – The New York Times

 Julia Child Credit Paul Child, courtesy Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University

Julia Child Credit Paul Child, courtesy Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University

At the height of Julia Child’s fame in the 1970s and ’80s, Thanksgiving guests often felt the need to tell her she should get her home number removed from the public directory. (This was an analog tool called a “telephone book.”)

Source: Thanksgiving, the Julia Child Way – The New York Times

Editorial note: Pretty sad but speaks to generational changes going on, when you have to explain in a “New York Times” article what a telephone book “was.” Aside, they do still make telephone books, but not as many…