What to Do in Honolulu – NYTimes.com

The name Honolulu can conjure up frenzied activity: exploring the sea with electric scooters, high-altitude extreme parasailing, close encounters with sharks, 40-miles-per-hour motorboat rides that guarantee you’ll get wet. But Honolulu can also mean mellow: the fragrance of a custom-made orchid lei, the taste and texture of a perfect tuna sashimi slice, the elegance of a hula dancer, the deepening of the blues and greens of the sea as the sun sets. Even the steel-mesh netting to prevent falling rocks is partly hidden so as to blend with the landscape. Then there is the pace, the feeling that no one is ever too rushed to give you directions, take your dinner order or explain the history of a 100-year-old banyan tree.

via What to Do in Honolulu – NYTimes.com.

When Google is your librarian and Starbucks your WiFi, do we still need public libraries? – The Washington Post

Libraries are repositories of books, music and documents, but above all of nostalgia: the musty stacks, the unexpected finds, the safety and pleasure of a place that welcomes and shelters unconditionally.

John Palfrey shares these memories, but he is also wary of them. After all, fond recollections of pleasant reading rooms can cloud our judgment of what libraries offer us — and need from us — today. In an era when search engines, online retailers and social media are overtaking some of libraries’ essential tasks, “nostalgia can actually be dangerous,” Palfrey warns. “Thinking of libraries as they were ages ago and wanting them to remain the same is the last thing we should want for them.”

via When Google is your librarian and Starbucks your WiFi, do we still need public libraries? – The Washington Post.

How Washington Derailed Amtrak – NationalJournal.com

Thirty-nine minutes into his southbound ride from Wilmington, Delaware, to Washington, D.C., Joseph H. Boardman, president and CEO of Amtrak, begins to cry. We’re in the dining car of a train called the Silver Star, surrounded by people eating hamburgers. The Silver Star runs from New York City to Miami in 31 hours, or five more hours than the route took in 1958, which is when our dining car was built. Boardman and I have been discussing the unfortunate fact that 45 years since its inception, the company he oversees remains a poorly funded, largely neglected ward of the state, unable to fully control its own finances or make its own decisions. I ask him, “Is this a frustrating job?”

via How Washington Derailed Amtrak – NationalJournal.com.

English: AEM-7 905 leads the Silver Star to Mi...

English: AEM-7 905 leads the Silver Star to Miami, stopping here at Trenton Transit Center (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

MH Abrams, Norton anthology founder, influential critic, dead at age 102 | Books | The Guardian

MH Abrams, an esteemed critic and teacher who helped shape the modern literary canon as founding editor of the Norton Anthology of English Literature and joined the elite himself by writing one of the 20th century’s most acclaimed works of criticism, has died. He was 102.

Abrams’ death was confirmed on Wednesday by the president of Cornell University, David J Skorton, who declined to give

The cover of the eighth edition

The cover of the eighth edition (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

details. According to the website of the Ithaca university, where he was a longtime member of the English department, Abrams died on Tuesday at the retirement community Kendal at Ithaca. No cause of death was given.

via MH Abrams, Norton anthology founder, influential critic, dead at age 102 | Books | The Guardian.

 

Los Angeles Public Library wins top award for cultural institutions – LA Times

The Los Angeles Public Library has won a National Medal for Museum and Library Service, the most prestigious award for libraries and museums, given yearly to 10 cultural institutions.

The L.A. institution was the only California library this year to win the medal, given by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

via Los Angeles Public Library wins top award for cultural institutions – LA Times.

English: The South Hope Street entrance of the...

English: The South Hope Street entrance of the Los Angeles Central Library in downtown Los Angeles, California. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Travel Tip of the Day

The College Girl's Guide to Study Abroad

If you normally wear contact lenses, toss a case filled with solutions and a backup pair of glasses in your bag before you go out each day while your traveling. You may have allergies you don’t know about, as certain plants might be more common in different areas. If your eyes start to get really itchy, you’ll be able to take your contacts out without heading back to your hostel first.

Also if you want to show off your manicure, pretending to have itchy eyes is a great way to do so subtly…

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Eating To Break 100: Longevity Diet Tips From The Blue Zones : The Salt : NPR

In the new book, which was released April 7, Buettner distills the researchers’ findings on what all the Blue Zones share when it comes to their diet. Here’s a taste:

Stop eating when your stomach is 80 percent full to avoid weight gain.

Eat the smallest meal of the day in the late afternoon or evening.

Eat mostly plants, especially beans. And eat meat rarely, in small portions of 3 to 4 ounces. Blue Zoners eat portions this size just five times a month, on average.

Drink alcohol moderately and regularly, i.e. 1-2 glasses a day.

via Eating To Break 100: Longevity Diet Tips From The Blue Zones : The Salt : NPR.

 

Moleskine Notebooks Adapt to the Digital World – NYTimes.com

During his travels, the author Bruce Chatwin famously scribbled in small black notebooks with covers made of oilcloth, a tightly woven cotton coated in linseed oil; each was wrapped in an elastic band. He stocked up on them at a Parisian paper store and took them on trips to Brazil, Afghanistan and Australia and to a dinner meeting in New York with Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.

Chatwin wrote about the notebooks themselves in his 1987 book “The Songlines,” invoking the French name for them, “carnets moleskins.” He also lamented that the moleskines were no longer being manufactured. When an Italian designer named Maria Sebregondi read Chatwin’s book nearly a decade later and discovered that the moleskine style of notebook had also been used by Pablo Picasso, Vincent van Gogh and Ernest Hemingway, she decided to trademark the moleskine name and revive the notebooks.

via Moleskine Notebooks Adapt to the Digital World – NYTimes.com.

A selection of Moleskine notebooks.

A selection of Moleskine notebooks. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

What to Do on the Left Bank, Paris – NYTimes.com

While the Right Bank of Paris has seen internationalism and the irrepressible rise of “bobos” (the Parisian form of hipsters) change its landscape in recent years, the Left Bank has been able to preserve the soul of the French capital. Walk through the Latin Quarter’s crooked cobblestone corridors or down the grand plane-tree-lined boulevards of St.-Germain-des-Prés and, more than once, you’ll think you’re inside a black-and-white Robert Doisneau photo. Cafe terraces, limestone buildings and nattily dressed locals create a timeless tableau. That’s not to say that Paris south of the dividing Seine is immune to change. But at least for now, the classic charms outweigh the contemporary influences.

via What to Do on the Left Bank, Paris – NYTimes.com.

Archive of Recorded Poetry and Literature Center at the Library of Congress

As part of National Poetry Month the Poetry and Literature Center has launched the Archive of Recorded Poetry and Literature, a series of audio-recorded readings of renowned poets and prose writers reading from their work at the Library of Congress. Recordings include readings by former consultants in Poetry Elizabeth Bishop, Gwendolyn Brooks and Robert Frost; Nobel Laureates Mario Vargas Llosa and Czeslaw Milosz; and celebrated writers such as Ray Bradbury, Margaret Atwood, and Kurt Vonnegut.

The Archive of Recorded Poetry and Literature at the Library of Congress dates back to 1943, when Allen Tate was Consultant in Poetry. It contains nearly two thousand recordings—of poets and prose writers participating in literary events at the Library’s Capitol Hill campus as well as sessions at the Library’s Recording Laboratory.

Most of these recordings were captured on magnetic tape reels, and are only accessible at the Library itself. In digitizing the archive and presenting it online, the Library hopes to greatly broaden its use and value. The material featured on this online presentation represents a sample of this collection. The site will continue to provide additional items from this archive on a monthly basis over the next several years.

via Archive of Recorded Poetry and Literature Center at the Library of Congress.

Originally posted by Gary Price at Infodocket.. http://www.infodocket.com/2015/04/15/an-archive-of-recorded-poetry-and-literature-debuts-on-library-of-congress-web-site/